Dr. Mike Marshall's Pitching Coach Services

Analysis of Dr. Marshall's 2007 Baseball Pitchers

     To watch the video and high-speed film of Dr. Marshall's eleven 2007 baseball pitchers, in the column to the right, simply click on the name of each baseball pitcher.  Unfortunately, to be able to show my video, we have had to severely compressed the data, such that the clarity is not as good as on the DVDs.  However, viewers will see clearly enough to determine how well each baseball pitcher performs Dr. Marshall's basebal pitching motion.

     To analyze these DVDs, we need to develop a system that checks for all flaws.

01.  In the first view that I provide, we get to watch real-time rear view video of each of the six adult baseball pitches that I teach.  Therefore, the purpose of this segment is to evaluate the quality of the movement of the pitches.  This means that we have to have six separate evaluations.

02.  In the second view that I provide, we get to watch the first view a second time, but at one-quarter speed. Because the video repeats the same frame four times, we can more easily watch the path of the baseball during the 'Transition Phase' of the baseball pitching motion.

     a.  First, we need to evaluate how well my baseball pitchers pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and up to driveline height straight toward second base.

     b.  Second, we need to evaluate how well my baseball pitchers move from my 'Loaded Slingshot' position into my 'Slingshot' position, especially how far laterally behind their head they take the baseball.

03.  In the third view that I provide, at one-quarter speed, we get to watch the front view video of each of the six adult baseball pitches that I teach.  Therefore, the purpose of this segment is to evaluate how well my baseball pitchers use their legs and rotate their body to properly position their pitching arms.  This means that we need to determine from where in relationship with the pitching rubber do my baseball pitchers release their Maxline and Torque pitches.

     a.  I want my baseball pitchers to release their Maxline pitches outside of the glove side of home plate, such that they can apply lateral force to these pitches toward the pitching arm side of home plate.  This means that they need to move the center of mass of their body at least one foot to their glove side.  To do this, they need to use my 'Drop Step' glove leg action.

     b.  I want my baseball pitchers to release their Torque pitches outside of the pitching arm side of home plate, such that they can apply lateral force to these pitches toward the glove side of home plate.  This means that they need to keep the center of mass of their body in line with their pitching foot.  To do this, they need to use my 'Cross Step' glove leg action.

04.  In the fourth view that I provide, we get to watch high-speed film of the front view of each of the six adult baseball pitches that I teach.  Therefore, the purpose of this segment is to evaluate the quality of the releases of my pitches.

     a.  First, we need to determine how vertical their pitching forearm is at release. The more vertical their pitching forearm, the better the quality of their releases.

     b.  Second, we need to determine how well my baseball pitchers apply middle finger force to the releases of my pitches.  This means that we need to evaluate how powerfully they drive their index and middle fingers through the baseball and whether they achieve the proper spin axes and what spin velocities they achieve.

     c.  Third, we need to determine how powerfully they pronated their releases.  To do this, after they release their pitches, we watch how quickly and how far they turn the thumb of their pitching hand downward and even outward and whether their pitching hand moves beyond the midline of their body.

05.  In the fifth view that I provide, we get to high-speed film of the side view of each of the six adult baseball pitches that I teach.  In many ways, this view tells us the most about the quality of their baseball pitching motion.

     a.  First, we need to determine how far behind the pitching rubber that my baseball pitcher take the baseball before its first movement toward home plate.  That point is the start of the driveline.

     b.  Second, we need to determine how well my baseball pitchers move from my 'Loaded Slingshot' position into my 'Slingshot' position.  This means that, from the first moment that they move the baseball toward home plate until their glove foot lands, how well do they raise their pitching elbow to driveline height.

     c. Third, we need to determine how well my baseball pitchers keep their pitching hand the full length of their pitching forearm behind their pitching elbow.  This means that we want to know whether, to prematurely move their pitching hand forward, they either bend their pitching forearm or they inwardly rotate their pitching upper arm.

     In either case, because they moved their pitching hand forward, they will have prematurely accelerated the forward movement of the baseball, which, when they start the 'Pitching Upper Arm Acceleration Phase' of my baseball pitching motion, they will start at a lower uniform velocity than they would have had they left their pitching hand the full length of their pitching forearm behind their pitching elbow.

     d.  Fourth, we need to determine the horizontal path of the baseball.  To achieve their maximum release velocity and consistency, my baseball pitchers need to start the forward movement of the baseball at about shoulder height and gradually raise the baseball to driveline height at about the top of their head, such that when they drive the baseball as far forward and as high as they can, the upward slope of their 'Pitching Forearm Acceleration Phase,' is as close to forty-five degrees as possible.

     e.  Fifth, we need to determine how far in front of and how high above the pitching rubber my baseball pitchers release their pitches.  To determine the total length of their driveline, we add how far behind the pitching rubber my baseball pitchers started their driveline to how far in front of the pitching rubber they released my pitchers.  Remember that the pitching rubber is six inches wide.

     f.  Sixth, we need to determine how well my baseball pitchers forwardly rotated their hips, shoulders and pitching upper arms.  To do this, at release, we look at the position of their pitching knee relative to their glove knee.

     When we methodically evaluate how my baseball pitchers perform my baseball pitching motion with each of the six baseball pitches in the manner that I describe above, then we can better understand what they need to do to become the best, injury-free, highly-skilled baseball pitcher that they can be.

     This is the type of video that enables baseball pitching coaches to determine whether their baseball pitchers are applying their genetic maximum force to the baseball.  The failure of 'traditional' baseball pitching coaches to understand how their baseball pitchers apply force to their pitches explains why they continue to teach them the injurious flaws that destroys pitching arms.  Without high-speed film, they have absolutely no idea what their baseball pitchers are doing.

     Well, what I teach is transparent.  I know how my baseball pitchers apply force.  I know where my baseball pitchers need to adjust their force application technique.  I make sure that my baseball pitchers also know where they need to adjust their force application technique.  As a result, my baseball pitchers not only do not have injurious flaws in their baseball pitching motion, they also learn how to correct their mechanical flaws.  And, I want everybody else to know it.

    That is what I call, "Coaching Baseball Pitchers."



Baseball Pitching Instructional Video










01.  Sam Buchanan

02.  Alfredo Caballero

03.  Mike Farrenkopf

04.  Kyle Francis

05.  Patrick Howe

06.  Derek Laughman

07.  Charlie Long

08.  Jason Schmeidel

09.  Jeff Sparks

10.  Joe Williams

11.  Clint Wilson
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